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English grammar – All or whole

pronuncia de palavras

All and whole are determiners.

We use them before nouns and with other determiners to refer to a total number or complete set of things in a group.

Compare

All the cast had food poisoning. They were forced to cancel the show.

all + determiner + noun

The whole cast had food poisoning. They were forced to cancel the show.

determiner + whole + noun

All my family lives abroad. or My whole family lives abroad.

We often use all and the whole with of the:

She complains all of the time. or She complains the whole of the time.

We use a/an with whole but not with all:

I spent a whole day looking for that book and eventually found it in a little old bookshop on the edge of town.

Not: … all a day

 

All or whole for single entities

We use the whole or the whole of to refer to complete single things and events that are countable and defined:

The whole performance was disappointing from start to finish. (or The whole of the performance was disappointing …)

When we can split up a thing into parts, we can use either whole or all with the same meaning:

You don’t have to pay the whole (of the) bill at once.

You don’t have to pay all (of) the bill at once.

She ate the whole orange.

She ate all of the orange.

We often use the whole of with periods of time to emphasise duration:

We spent the whole (of the) summer at the beach.

(“All or whole ?” de English Grammar Today © Cambridge University Press.)

Cambridge

fevereiro 6, 2017 Posted by | Inglês | , , , , , , , , | Deixe um comentário

English Grammar – All or Every

curiosidades do verbo to be

all and every are determiners.

We use both all and every to refer to the total number of something. All refers to a complete group. Every refers to each member of a complete group:

The questionnaire was sent to all employees.

The questionnaire was sent to every employee.

We can use every to focus on each individual member.

Compare

All passengers must turn off their mobile phones.

refers to the whole group

Every passenger must turn off their mobile phone.

(We use their instead of his or her to refer back to a singular noun (passenger) because we are referring to both male and female passengers.)

focuses on each individual member of the whole group

We can use all, but not every, on its own without a noun. We use everyone/everybody/everything instead:

The meeting is at Oriel Hall. It begins at 8 pm and all are welcome.

Not: … every is welcome

Everyone is welcome to join the village social club.

 All and every + nouns

The meaning of all and every is very similar but we use them in different ways. We use all with plural and uncountable nouns and every with singular nouns:

All donations will be sent to the earthquake relief fund.

All equipment must be returned by the end of June. (uncountable)

Every donation is appreciated.

We can use all and all of before determiners, but we don’t use every before determiners:

I invited all (of) my friends.

Not: … every my friends

(“All or every ?” de English Grammar Today © Cambridge University Press.)

 

fevereiro 3, 2017 Posted by | Inglês | , , , , , , , | Deixe um comentário

Across, over or through?

Pronuncia escrita de frases inglês

Pronúncia Escrita

Across

We use across as a preposition (prep) and an adverb (adv). Across means on the other side of something, or from one side to the other of something which has sides or limits such as a city, road or river:

We took a boat [PREP]across the river.

[PREP]Across the room, she could see some old friends. She got up and went to join them.

My neighbour came [ADV]across to see me this morning to complain about our cat.

The road was so busy that we found it difficult to get [ADV]across.

We also use across when something touches or stretches from one side to another:

The Ponte Vecchio is a beautiful old bridge across the river Arno in Florence.

She divided the page by drawing a red line across it. Then she cut it in two.

Especially in American English, across from is used to refer to people or objects being ‘opposite’ or ‘on the other side’:

The pharmacy is across from the Town Hall.

Helen’s office is just across from mine.

We use across to emphasise that something is happening at the same time in many places, e.g. within an organisation, a city or a country:

She’s opened coffee shops across the city and they’re very successful.

Across the country, people are coming out to vote for a new president.

We also use across to refer to the width or diagonal measurement of something:

The size of a television screen is measured from the higher corner of one side to the lower corner of the other side, that is, from one corner across to the opposite corner.

Across comes after measurements when we talk about diameter or width:

The building is 157 metres long, 92 metres across and the façade is 68 metres wide.

Over

We use over as a preposition and an adverb to refer to something at a higher position than something else, sometimes involving movement from one side to another:

From the castle tower, you can see [PREP]over the whole city.

We toasted marshmallows [PREP]over the fire.

We drove high up [PREP]over the mountains on a narrow dangerous road.

Suddenly a plane flew [ADV]over and dropped hundreds of leaflets.

Come over often means to come to the speaker’s home:

You must come [ADV]over and have dinner with us some time.

Especially when we use them as adverbs, over can mean the same as across:

We walked over to the shop. (or We walked across to the shop – the shop is on the other side of the road)

I was going across to say hello when I realised that I couldn’t remember his name. (or I was goingoverto say … meaning ‘to the other side of the street or room’)

(“Across, over or through ?” de English Grammar Today © Cambridge University Press.)

janeiro 29, 2017 Posted by | Inglês | , , , , , , , , , , , | Deixe um comentário

No doubt or without doubt?

ingles2

(“No doubt or without doubt ?” de English Grammar Today © Cambridge University Press.)

 

janeiro 29, 2017 Posted by | Inglês | , , , , | Deixe um comentário

English pronunciation – relative clauses

relatives clauses – ure lativs cló zis ou clôzis – oração relativa

01) Have you seen the shoes that I bought today?
Você viu os sapatos que eu comprei ontem?

The word ‘that’ define – or give more information about – the thing that we are talking about.
A palavra que define – ou dá mais informação sobre – a coisa que nós estamos falando.

We start with a noun and then we add a relative pronoun, such as who or that, plus a verb phrase, The relative pronoun who is for peoble.
Nós começamos com um nome e então nós adicionamos um pronome relativo, tal como quem ou que, mas um vorbo frasal. O pronome quem é para pessoas.

02) The man who owns this restaurant is my best frend.
O homem que possui este restaurante é meu melhor amigo,

The pronoun ‘which’ is for things, and we use ‘that’ for both, people and things.
O pronome “a qual” é para coisas, e nós usamos “que” para ambos, pessoas e coisas.

Which – o que, que, qual, quais, as quais, os quais, etc

03) Spring is the season which I enjoy the most.
Primavera é a estação a qual eu aproveito o máximo.

04) That woman is the doctor who saw me yesterday.
Essa mulher é a médica que me atendeu ontem.

05) That woman is the doctor who I saw yesterday.
Aquela mulher é a doutora que eu vi (fui atendido) ontem.

So the rule is: when the pronoun refers to the subject, it’s:
Então a regra é: quando o pronome refere-se ao sujeito, fica:

06) She’s the doctor who saw me yesterday.
Ela é a doutora que me atendeu ontem.

When the pronoun refers to the object it’s;
Quando o pronome se refere ao objeto fica:

07) She’s the doctor who I saw yesterday.
Ela é a doutora pelo qual eu fui atendido ontem.

English Pronunciation:

Choose or shoes

to or for

Make polite requests

Introduce Yourself

Making suggestions is easy

 Answering interview question

Piss – piece – peace

How to prepare for interview

Looking for a job

English pronunciation for business

Audio pronunciation – asking for directions

Phrases to people who are going away

Written pronunciation in portuguese

English pronunciation – little

I appreciate it

Phrases with the

Here hear year ear

Beach bitch

Hole holy holly

Palavras homófonas

steel – steal – sea – see

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outubro 25, 2016 Posted by | Inglês | , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Deixe um comentário

   

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